Make way for readers | No to dogs on public transport

The majority of readers who responded to the call for all to The Press, Tuesday, on the possibility of accepting dogs in public transport spoke out against this change, which is being studied by the Société de transport de Montréal (STM). Nearly three-quarters of some 300 respondents do not want animals on buses and in the metro, as proposed by the Ensemble Montréal party. Here is a sample of the responses.

Posted yesterday at 8:00 a.m.

Isabelle Ducas

Isabelle Ducas
The Press

Allergy

I am VERY allergic to a protein in dog saliva. Contact with them in a closed environment leads me straight to the emergency room, struggling with a major bronchospasm. So, if dogs get on board, I get off. More broadly, how to control the bellicose temperaments of certain animals that their masters themselves do not control, as well as their urges to defecate? Are we arguing over masks on public transport, and we want to add dogs to the equation? Bravo for social peace.

Manon

According to breed

It all depends on the master and the dog breeds. To be banned: pit bulls and their cousins. On a leash, with a muzzle, many dogs are carefree. I love dogs. But it will be necessary to provide a cleaning brigade.

Marie-Josee

Yes, with certain tags

I am a huge lover of dogs and all other animals. I think the ability to bring our dog on public transport is a great idea, with some guidelines. I would like the dogs to wear a muzzle as much for the safety of the other passengers as for the owner. A dog, even the nicest one, can bite. He may be surprised by someone who wants to pet him, he may be nervous on the bus with a lot of people around him. This would have the effect of reassuring people who are afraid of dogs. That way, I think it would be possible and much appreciated. Instead of leaving your dog alone at home, we can bring it with us!

Johanna

What to do if…

What if Fido can’t tolerate the other Fido? What if the gentleman enters with his untrained Doberman who goes uninvited to fearful users? What if you’re mistaken for a pole and your pants serve as an absorbent? Every year, humans are attacked by these quadrupeds, which owners are unable to control, not to mention excessive yelping. Nice atmosphere, isn’t it?

richard

Pay their place

If they go that far, I hope the dog owners will have to pay for their spot, as they will be using a customer’s spot. In my opinion, the behavior of the owners, and of their dogs, is too disparate to authorize the presence of dogs within the crowd. Even with a reserved wagon, they would have to move among the users to get there. It’s no. That would be enough for me to use my car to get around the office.

France

Modernization

Absolutely agree ! We see this everywhere in Europe and everything is going well. It is time for us to show maturity and modernize. Let’s stop managing for exceptions, and the “yes, but there are people who are afraid, there are allergies, there are fine steps”, etc. Let’s get out of the paternalism that is leading Quebec to irresponsibility.

Linda

Logistic problems

Dogs on public transport pose some problems, especially during rush hour. Why would a dog come and take the space that could be occupied by a customer who, to earn a living, has to travel by metro or bus? If we limit the presence of dogs at certain times and in certain wagons, how can we be sure that dog owners are using the wagons provided? The logistical problems inherent in the presence of dogs are therefore numerous and can endanger the safety and comfort of users (yelping, cleanliness and allergies, among others). Airlines had allowed pets on planes for a while. They reconsidered their decision and returned to the practice of small animals in cages, which must be housed under a seat. Why not use their experience rather than trying to reinvent the wheel?

Gisele

A member of the family

The dog is part of the family. The majority of masters take care of their animal and respect the directives and regulations of the City, it will be the same inside public transport, permission which will prevent us from taking the car to go to the veterinarian or visit the family. . I therefore fully agree that dogs on a leash should be accepted in the metro and the bus.

Marlene

Leave your pet at home

That does not make any sense. Dog owners are mostly without embarrassment. Some will take the seats to put their dog there. There are elderly, allergic or sick people who have to take public transport. What about hygiene? The excrement of these animals will eventually end up everywhere in bus shelters, in metro stations and in garbage cans. Can you imagine the smell? We must stop mistaking animals for human beings. After public transport, what will it be like? Will people be able to go to medical appointments with their pet? Maybe at work or at a show? It has no limit. Leave your pet at home. You adopted it, you take care of it and it’s perfect. But stop imposing it on those who don’t want it.

Johanna

Absurd!

Having worked in the canine field for 25 years, I am amazed to see that people even dare to think that this can be done! Absurd! What I have seen, after these years of work, is that people who own dogs consider them human beings. How to think of integrating dogs in public transport when the masters are unable to control their animal in society? People walk around with leashes 10 to 20 feet long, sending them right through our legs. They let their pet do its business anywhere. Not to mention those who have no notion of hygiene (fleas, diseases, etc.). I think of my 85-year-old mother who uses public transport regularly and who would trip over a dog leash… I am worried about it!

Sylvia

Designated wagons

I support designated carriages for dogs as well as set times, as I see no place for them in the crowded rush hour carriages. It would certainly be a test to do, but it would be necessary to limit the weight and size of the animal, as is done in some rental accommodations.

Francoise

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