Good news in the fight against neurodegenerative diseases. According to a recent study, it would actually be possible to detect dementia up to 10 years before the diagnosis of patients. Explanations.

When dementia is diagnosed, it is often too late. But good news: according to a recent study, the results of which were published in the journal Alzheimer & Dementia and reported by the Daily Mail, it would actually be possible to detect the disease up to 10 years before patients are diagnosed. . To reach such a conclusion, the researchers analyzed data from half a million British participants aged 40 to 69.

In addition to collecting information about the participants’ health, they also had them take a series of tests that included problem solving, memory, reaction times and grip strength. Information on weight loss and gain and the number of falls was also collected.

All of this data was then compared with information collected between five and nine years earlier. “When we reviewed the patient histories, it became clear that they had cognitive impairment for several years before their symptoms became clear enough to trigger a diagnosis.” said Dr. Nol Swaddiwudhipong, from the University of Cambridge.

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One step forward

Specifically, people who developed Alzheimer’s disease performed worse than healthy people on problem-solving tasks, reaction times, memorizing lists of numbers, prospective memory (our ability to remember to do something later), and pair-matching. At the same time, they were more likely to have fallen in the previous 12 months.

Experts said the result could lead to routine screening for those most at risk. They could benefit from early treatment and clinical trials.

As a reminder, there are currently very few effective treatments for dementia or other neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease. Diagnosing dementia much earlier could be a game-changer, scientists say.

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